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5 Post-Purchase Sales Emails Your Ecommerce Store NEEDS to Be Sending

5 Post-Purchase Sales Emails

Call it whatever you wanna call it — retention, post-purchase, lifecycle.

The fact is that for virtually every online store, revenue growth depends on getting more repeat customers. The work ain’t over just because you got the sale!

And while sending newsletters and new product updates is all well and dandy, there are LOTS of other types of emails stores can send — SHOULD BE sending — to encourage repeat purchases.

I’ve collected 5 recent, real-life example emails from my own inbox, and organized them from most common (the types of emails I see all the time) to super rare (AKA the types I WISH I saw more often).

Take a look.

Then emulate the sh** out of them, because that’s how you up your game, brah.

5. Most Common: The Related Products Sales Email

(Click the image to open it full-size in a new tab.)

FROM: Best Buy Weekly Ad

SUBJECT LINE: Your LG – 43″ Class (42.5″… <— missing parenthesis theirs; it’s either sloppy proofing or sly genius to get people to open the email

best buy personalized recommended products

Why I Love This Email:

This is one of the most common types of post-purchase emails online stores send–and for good reason. It leverages data about the customer (in this case, a recent purchase) to suggest related items.

This email is personalized to me and my recent order from Best Buy (a TV to replace the one my ex took when he moved out. I’M FINE, DON’T WORRY ABOUT ME).

Notice the encouraging, specific social proof: “Customers who bought your TV also bought…”. Best Buy follows that line with “For your new TV, we recommend…”

4. Common: The Birthday/Anniversary Coupon Sales Email

(Click the image to open it full-size in a new tab.)

FROM: Nisolo

SUBJECT LINE: A birthday treat.

nisolo birthday email

Why I Love This Email:

Honestly, who doesn’t need an excuse to buy more shoes?

Stores can capitalize on customers’ goodwill by sending a coupon on any or all of these occasions:

  • The customer’s purchase/membership anniversary
  • The customer’s birthday
  • The store’s own “birthday”/founding date

Here, Nisolo uses its own store anniversary as an excuse to hold a two-day sale.

I love that this email focuses on the founders and their picks instead of highlighting products by themselves. It keeps the focus on the ostensible “celebration,” and directs readers to a cherry-picked selection instead of tossing them onto a generic product category page.

3. Less Common: The Limited Stock Sales Email

(Click the image to open it full-size in a new tab.)

FROM: Rothy’s

SUBJECT LINE: Retiring Soon: Shale Ribbon Stripe

Why I Love This Email:

Another win for personalization here! Rothy’s (either lovingly or creepily, depending on how you feel about data) knows I’ve added the Shale Ribbon Stripe flats to my cart in the past.

And then walked away, because how many pairs of $125 flats does a girl need? Please don’t answer that.

But this ISN’T an abandoned cart email. Though Rothy’s also sends those.

This is a bald-faced appeal to my FOMO, and I’m lovin’ it. Do I want Rothy’s to retire these cute-ass shoes? I sure don’t!

Am I gonna snag a pair before they get “retired,” a la the Mafia? I SURE MIGHT!

Rothy’s knows I wanted these flats. And they know that the flats might sell out before I see this email*, so they helpfully included two other links to shoes I’ve ALSO expressed interest in.

Touche’, Rothy’s. You might get me to buy another pair sooner rather than later…

* They did. They sold out. God damn it.

2. Rare: The Post-Return or Cancellation Sales Email

(Click the image to open it full-size in a new tab.)

FROM: Dropps

SUBJECT LINE: Just checking in.

dropps cancel subscriptionWhy I Love This Email:

Look, I could write a book about Dropps’ marketing copy. It’s so hit-or-miss! Some of the auto-emails are so great, and some are so meh! Some are still set to their marketing/shipping platform’s default copy!

But for now, let’s zoom in on this email. Which I love.

How often do you see a sales email from a subscription company AFTER you cancel your subscription? Answer: Not often enough.

Dropps didn’t take my cancellation personally. They acknowledged that maybe it wasn’t the best fit for me. And they sent me a cute cocker spaniel with specific alternative product suggestions, then locked it in with a 20% off coupon code.

Remember–if a customer cancels their product subscription but doesn’t unsubscribe from your list, you can still email them! And it’ll be easier and cheaper than getting an all-new customer.

Same goes for non-subscription-model businesses. If a customer returns an item to your store, why not send her an email that says something like,

“Hey, Lianna! Saw that you needed to return that Extra Large Tyrannosaurus Rex Head because it didn’t fit–bummer! In case you’re still looking for something similar, here are a few products you might like.”

In fact… I got a very similar email recently.

It’s the rarest of all ecommerce sales emails: The Post-Return Personal Shopper Sales Email.

And though it’s got a terrible subject line, its intentions are pure gold.

1. Literally Never Saw It Before This: The Post-Return Personal Shopper Sales Email

(Click the image to open it full-size in a new tab.)

FROM: Mott & Bow

SUBJECT LINE: Mott & Bow/Styling Team/Request Inquiry <— yuck, come on, y’all

mott and bow feedback email

Why I Love This Email:

First of all, it’s plaintext. It might well have been sent through a platform like Zendesk, but it doesn’t matter, because it LOOKS like a bona fide email.

Second, it’s short and to the point: “I want to help you find the perfect pair of jeans.”

Mott & Bow knows that just because I returned my first pair, all’s not lost. I might be ready to try again–so they sicced Liz on me to personally find a better fit.

Third, it helps Mott & Bow build a stronger relationship with their customers. Not only are they helping me satisfy my #RealNeed for good jeans, they’re collecting valuable customer research while they do it.

If you’re not sending emails like this to your customers who return products, you’re missing out on a HUGE opportunity to turn what was once a loss on both sides to a seriously satisfying win-win.

Hey, you know what I’d LOVE to do?

I’d love to write emails like this for your store. Let’s transform your one-time customers into repeat buyers! All through lil ol’ words! Click the button below to make it happen:

Here’s How to Pick the Perfect GIF

how to pick the perfect gif

People ask me this a lot: “Lianna, how do you sniff out the GIFs you use obsessively in every piece of content you create?”

I shake my head sadly, and think, Oh, you poor sad slob. If you don’t get it now, you never will.

Then I ride off into the sunset on my high horse.

high horse yeee

Look how condescending this horse is!

Obviously, this is a horrible and shitty thing to think or say.

So instead of saying it, I decided to examine the actual thought process I go through when picking a GIF.

And write it down for you. So you never have to hire me. ????

GIFs are the future

True fact: GIFs (graphical interchange format, for all you acronym nerds) are uniquely hilarious.

Precisely because they’re less immersive — and thus less intimidating or time-consuming to enjoy — than videos, and waaaay more visually interesting than plain ol’ paragraphs of text, GIFs fill a singular role in content.

They ask little and deliver a lot. They’re a low-tech way to entertain, illustrate a point, crack a joke, you name it. Everyone should use ‘em.


I used to pronounce GIF with a hard G. Now I pronounce it with a soft G, like the sugary, salty peanut butter my mom wouldn’t buy us.

Why? Because the guy who invented it SAYS it should be a soft G. Respect, y’all.


I’m gonna walk you step-by-step through picking a GIF for your blog or email, using THIS VERY POST as an example.

It’s so meta that we might both implode, like dying stars or Donald Trump’s colon — but let’s see what happens.

First things first: Decide where you want a GIF

To find the ideal place for your GIF, zoom out and look at the entire structure of your document. You’re looking for…

  • Walls of text
  • Spots where you’re hammering home a point
  • And any other spot where you’d like to lighten the mood or provide a moment of levity

When I finished this post draft, I set my screen to 50% so I could see where I needed a GIF. Here’s what that looked like (META WARNING):

how to find the perfect GIF

Also, as I’m writing, if I know there’s a spot ripe for a joke, I’ll add [GIF] in brackets so I don’t have to interrupt my flow to go find one.

I’ll also include any notes about what I think the GIF could be, so I don’t accidentally publish without finding the GIF. Like so:

[GIF: how dare you]

Next, head to Giphy.com

(AHEM. Another reason it’s pronounced with a soft G? Because that means Giphy.com is pronounced “Jiffy”. As in, “Find your GIF in a jiffy.” YOU’RE WELCOME.)

Now you’re here on Giphy, and you’ve gotta decide what to search. This is where it gets tricky, and where most people are just like,

huh???

uh wat

See what I did there?

The secret search sauce

And now, the secret sauce. Consider it my GIF to you. ????

Read the sentence right before the place you’ve decided to insert the GIF.

Right after you read it, imagine making a SHORT, offhanded, under-your-breath joke to a friend next to you. You’re looking for a two-to-three-word phrase, like:

  • Am I right?
  • Oh God
  • How bout them apples??!

Etc.

Then type that phrase into Giphy, and WATCH THE MAGIC HAPPEN.

Depending on how esoteric your search phrase is, you’ll get a page of either directly or tangentially related GIFs. Fair warning: at least 8% of them will contain boobs.

You can also use GIFs to finish a thought, like I did above with the poodle GIF. Advanced users only, please.

So, here I am on Giphy. I’ve decided I need a GIF to finish the sentence “This is where it gets tricky, and where most people are just like… ”

Because I know that sentence would end with “Huh???” if I were writing it, I search “Huh?” in Giphy.

I get these results:

giphy search results

So many quizzical, bemused faces!!

And I pick the poodle head-tilt GIF, as you already knew.

Why did I pick THAT one? Well, a few reasons…

Lianna’s Very Official, Extremely Important Rules for Picking GIFs

  • GIFs must be high-res. Unless they’re REALLY good. And even then, use small or low-res GIFs sparingly. Only one shitty GIF per content piece (please tweet this)
  • No esoteric pop culture or other references. While it’s so, so awesome to use a GIF from The Office because I know my readers love that shit just as much as I do, there’s always a risk of ascribing too much weight or meaning to a GIF that a reader won’t “get”.

    So aim to pick a GIF that’s funny even without knowing what show, movie, or catastrophic life event it’s from. Like this one:
  • zootopia(It’s from Zootopia, but that doesn’t matter.)

 

  • Nothing overly distracting. GIFs that loop for too long run the risk of distracting your reader, so I try to pick shorter loops. I also often eschew GIFs including text, unless the text can conceivably read like an extension of the writing.
  • Nothing racist, sexist, or otherwise offensive or marginalizing. I tend toward the absurd/surreal anyhow, but if there’s ANY chance a GIF would offend your target reader, it’s better to pick a different one.
  • Don’t settle… but also don’t overthink it. The first GIF that stands out to you and meets all these criteria is probably the right one.
  • Pick a few, then whittle it down. Not sure which GIF is right? Open a few in new tabs, and then pick your fave.

That’s it! Only 6 simple rules to keep in mind.


Six rules isn’t simple, you say? Your mind can only hold three rules at a time? Good thing you can hire me to do this for you, then.


If this process DIDN’T work for you, that’s OK. It happens. Here’s how to troubleshoot crappy or nonexistent GIF search results:

Think of a different or related phrase, and search again.

This isn’t as annoying as it sounds, because you’ll find that your first page of Giphy search results will inspire you to make different searches. Sometimes, just a slight phrasing difference (say, from “no thank you” to “no thanks” or even to “do not want”) will turn up the perfect GIF.

Like this one:

perfect gif is perfect

Try this method and tell me what happens

Especially if you’ve thought “Garsh, I just can’t pick a GIF to save my life!” Which I’m sure all of three people planetwide have thought.

ANALYSIS: How Dollar Shave Club Introduces Humor in Its Homepage Copy

Analysis_ Dollar Shave Club

YES, THAT’S RIGHT, IT’S THE SECOND INSTALLMENT OF “UNAUTHORIZED, UNASKED-FOR REVIEWS OF OTHER PEOPLE’S WEB COPY”!

I’m your host, Lianna Patch, and you can read my analysis of Purple’s Seat Cushion Landing page right here if you haven’t already.

Today I’m gonna take you through the current iteration of Dollar Shave Club’s homepage. Like Purple, DSC first went viral with a hilarious ad:

And their branding promises punchy, masculine fun in both their marketing copy and their physical products.

But when I went through DSC’s homepage this weekend, one thing struck me: They play it pretttttty slow and safe when introducing humor into their copy.

Lemme go through why I think they’re taking it slow, since, you know, this is my blog and all.

Here’s the page I’m looking at:

Dollar Shave Club Homepage (as of January 2018)

Click to view a full-size, zoomable version of the annotated page in a new tab. Then scroll down for my thoughts on what DSC is doing, what’s working, and what’s not.

Dollar Shave Club Homepage_Annotated

What Dollar Shave Club is doing on this page

First things first: DSC is currently using its homepage as a sales page for its Starter Sets.

There are 4 calls to action throughout the page. 3 of those link to a landing page with more options for Starter Sets, and one is a direct Add to Cart link.

There are a few reasons why DSC would choose to treat its homepage as a sales page:

  1. Homepages are overrated and usually poorly executed  — “Let’s put everything we do right here on the homepage and make people scroll until they get bored!!11eleventy”
  2. DSC knows most people become customers through the Starter Set, and they want to make that acquisition easier
  3. They know they can more easily show value through their actual service than here on this page, so they’re gunning to get signups/sales as soon as possible.

OR MAYBE IT’S ALL 3! Or maybe there is another Mystery Reason (TM)!

We in agreement? Cool. Let’s check out the page section by section.

Section 1 (Hero: “Experience Butter with the Classic Shave Starter Set”)

The first thing you notice when you land on the homepage is the hero section video, which I ADORE.

It very quickly turns from a standard product shot (a hand reaching for shaving cream — excuse me, shave butter) to a comedic display of what using the product presumably feels like.

AKA riding a creamy Slip N’ Slide to Shave Heaven, where a distinguished older gentleman gently and sweetly blows the beard right off your scruffy face. I’ll take it.

 

Now, this video is our first clue that DSC is aiming to brand itself with humor.

And it’s our only clue. Because the copy in this hero section is straight-up boring by itself.

Imagine the video didn’t load when you visited this page, for one reason or another.

All you’d see is “Experience Butter [with the Classic Shave Starter Set].” What does “Experience Butter” even mean?

The subhead does a good job of explaining and clarifying the offer — “Get Shave Butter and a month supply of our best razor for $5” — but that big headline is a waste of valuable space.

Regardless of the video or image in the hero section, the copy here needs to be able to stand on its own!  And right now, it’s as wobbly as a newborn fawn.

You’re welcome

Without even needing to be funny about it, DSC could have easily picked a more evocative headline; say, “Slip Into a Smoother Shave”. (Y’all can have that one. It’s free.)

So why doesn’t Dollar Shave Club go balls-to-the-wall with humor copywriting right away?

Well, because this is a homepage. They’re getting traffic from all different sources here, and not all of those visitors will know who DSC is or what they sell.

It’s better to be clear up front than potentially confusing a significant portion of that traffic — even at the risk of being boring, which the current hero section copy totally is.

Onward, noble steeds!

Section 2 (Offer: “A Starter Set is the ideal way to start”)

This section doubles down on the offer presented up top: Here’s what you get, here’s what it costs, and here’s what you’re signing up for. Pretty straightforward stuff.

Dollar Shave Club Homepage_Annotated_3

Again, there’s a wretchedly lazy header that isn’t working as hard as it could be. “A starter set is the ideal way to start.”

YOU DON’T SAY.

Quoth the Raven, “That shit was real dumb.”

To avoid this repetition (and redundancy), DSC shoulda gone with something like, “Your smoother shave starts here.” Or… “The Starter Kit is your key to a silkier shave.”

Look, I know it’s not Dickinson, but it’s better, OK?

Then we move on to a smaller section — let’s call it 2A — where readers get the deets on the Starter Kit and everything it contains month to month.

I’m not sure why there’s not more info available (like, in a hover or accordion or dropdown) about each of the included items.

Especially the Bathroom Minutes, since I’m guessing not a lot of people can intuit that that it’s a tiny, poop-pun-filled newspaper that DSC sends out with each of its cartridge refills. Why not specify?? It could be a selling point for… some people. 

But OK, they want to keep the page as uncomplicated as possible. Sure. Fine. Next.

Section 3 (Benefits: “3 reasons to try DSC”)

Another lazy swing and miss for this headline. Yes, it’s clear. But it’s also soooo boring.

A simple tweak could make this more persuasive — again, without even needing to inject humor:

“3 reasons to try DSC”  —> “Why should I try DSC?”

Putting this header in the reader’s voice helps the copy relate to what the user is probably asking him- (or her)self at that moment.

Notice how it’s “Why should I”  — not “Why should you,” which is how the original version is phrased (“3 reasons [why you should] try DSC”).

Make it about the reader, y’all

But here’s the interesting thing… this is the section where we start to see some flavor coming into the copy. Not in the headers — that might be too risky! — but in the body copy, right at the end. Just the way you might try to coax a friend into coming to a party when you know she’d rather stay at home in her footie pajamas.

We also get our first real, concrete, funny image: “level 9 yogi flexibility”.

Sadly, this is one of only three such “word pictures” that DSC paints on this page. (First person to find the other two gets a pat on the head from me and a hi-res photo of my cat lying upside down!

Actually, y’all can just have that photo now. You’re welcome.)

Such floof. Much relax!

Section 4 (The we just remembered this was a homepage, so here’s some content, we guess section: “We want more than just your body”)

Readers who have been following the thread of this homepage might do a double-take upon getting to this section, which seems like DSC’s marketing team remembered that homepages are supposed to offer something for everyone, so they threw up a bunch of blog links.

More subpar headline and subhead writing here. “We want more than just your body” is vague, awkwardly phrased, not really about the reader, and doesn’t connect with the subhead below–which is thus given the unfair burden of explaining that hey, DSC also runs a blog. 

I do like those intentionally gross blog thumbnail illustrations, though.

Section 4 (FAQ: “So what’s the catch?”)

Aha! LOOK THERE! A headline written from the user’s point of view! Thank glob.

We’ve finally reached the point where the copywriter(s) who wrote this page were allowed to start having some real fun. Either that, or they started drinking.

It’s been about 8 years. Time for another Mad Men GIF.

The way these FAQs are written is the tone we’ve WANTED from DSC, the tone they HINTED at throughout this page, dangled, and then snatched away.

Oh, to savor this major tone shift now, in the expanded accordion FAQ section! So far down the page!

Why? If someone has read this far, chances are they’re open to copy that takes a few more risks in trying to get their attention. Plus, the extra-sassy copy in some spots will feel like a reward to careful readers. 

TL;DR

Throughout the page, Dollar Shave Club graaaadually introduces humor into its copy. It gets fully up to its normal, buoyant self by the very bottom. DSC takes the conservative approach to homepage humor, and I get that.

Unfortunately, the last CTA comes in like a wet fart, with an extra line that makes the ‘Club look more anxious than confident. But hey, sometimes all you need is a good editor.

What do y’all think of this page?

And whose copy should I tackle next?

2017 Wrap-Up, Extreme Navel-Gazing Edition

*microphone feedback* Is this thing on?

Sorry, never done this wrap-up thing before.

I’d like to thank the Academy, my cat Space Ghost, and venlafaxine for getting me this far…

Nah, actually, I DO think it’s important for biz owners to acknowledge their efforts (and take stock of what’s working and what’s not) every once in a while. It’s just that I’ve never done it.

But this year, I started gaining real clarity and getting traction on the type of rewarding  nay, life-affirming  business I want to run.

So I’m writing it all down, just in case I wake up in Milwaukee in an amnesic fugue tomorrow morning.

terrence howard

Just call me “Confused Terrence Howard”.

Along with deciding in 2017 that I was going to focus on writing only emails, landing pages, and the occasional website, here’s everything I did this year and the effect it had on my business:

I spoke at things! And people listened!

This surprised no one more than me, believe me.

It was a huge honor this year to speak and/or teach for audiences at…

Lianna Patch Call to Action Conference

Look what a good time I can have with a Britney Spears microphone!
Photo of me at CTAConf by Ronnie Lee Hill Photography.

I’ve already got a couple of classes and conferences booked for 2018, and am so excited I could pee. I won’t, though. I promise.

If you want my brain, face, and body at your event in 2018, you can tell me more about it here.

I also did a fair few podcasts, which was super fun. Oh, you want me to get on the phone and dork out about comedy and copy? I’ll do that alllllll day.

These are definitely in the top 5:

I wrote a ton of articles for companies I adore

Because I generally prefer to slurp wine, watch The Crown, and avoid building my list at all costs*, I happily shared my marketing knowledge with some crazy-awesome companies this year instead of writing my own blogs.

Here are a few of my favorite guest posts:

* What can I say? Claire Foy gives a standout performance.

(OK, I did write some killers for the Punchline blog)

Not enough of them — but I see you, 2018, and I’m coming for you!

fist shaking

Here are my two best posts (*cough* only posts) from this year on my very own slice of the Internet:

And a very distant third.

I also ghostwrote a few pretty great pieces, but if I told you what they were, I’d have to kill you. And I’d rather not clean up a mess right now ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

I traveled to 5 countries

First France, then Canada, then Japan, Thailand, and Cambodia! More importantly, my new passport photo is hella cute. Take that, passport control guy who told haggard, 16-year-old, just-off-a-24-hour-international-flight me that “I looked much better now” than my old passport photo. Which, I’ll be honest, was horrific.

I worked with some truly incredible clients

From shilling software to slangin’ ecommerce product descriptions, I got to work on some really big, awesome projects this year. And while that by itself isn’t 100% notable, here’s what was: I remembered why I started doing this in the first place.

To my clients: THANK YOU for trusting me with your voice and your customers! 

Thank you for letting me get weird. Thank you for being open to GIFs. Thank you for going out on a limb to make a real connection with your people!

And that’s not even to mention the clients my SNAP Copy business partner, James E. Turner and I, worked with through our joint on-demand copywriting agency. Thank y’all for trusting us with your messaging.

…and I met instant business BFFs

Fun fact: I’ve never been a girly girl. (Please try to contain your shock.)

With few exceptions, I’ve always been the person who said, “It’s just easier for me to make friends with guys. Nothing against girls, but…”

I didn’t realize that I was just waiting for 2017 to meet, like, ALL of the badass women in marketing at once. Holllaaaaaaaaaa.

Claire Suellentrop, Lianna Patch, and Jessica Best

Look, it’s me with the incredible Claire Suellentrop (#businessbae) and equally amazing Jessica Best!

2017, you were a pile of hot garbage in so many ways… but in other ways, you were just hot. Good on ya.

Cheers to 2018, y’all!

ANALYSIS: How This Killer Ecommerce Sales Page Uses Humor to Convert

If you’ve read a single sentence on PunchlineCopy.com, you already know I’m deeply (probably overly) invested in how humor, jokes, and personality can shape conversions and influence consumer decision-making.

TERRY CREWS Y'ALL

But recently, I thought to myself,

“Hey, you know what? Maybe other folks don’t intrinsically love this idea as much as you. Maybe you need to SHOW them how and why humor works so well in marketing.”

So now I’m going around the Internet and finding hallmark examples of brands using humor strategically.

I’m screenshotting those emails and landing pages, annotating them, and painstakingly analyzing them right here on this homely little blog — so you can start to get where I’m coming from.

First up, we’ve got Purple.

Y’all probably know Purple. It’s the super cohesively branded mattress company that went viral with ads like this:

And their landing pages don’t disappoint, either. In keeping with the brand’s zany, carefree style, Purple’s landing pages use humor in combination with tried-and-testing copywriting best practices.

Here’s the Seat Cushion page, in all its glory:

Purple Seat Cushion Sales Page

Click to view a full-size, zoomable version of the annotated page in a new tab. Then scroll down for my thoughts on what Purple is doing and why it works.

Purple's humor conversion copywriting
Click to open the image in a new tab and zoom in for the comments.

What Purple is doing right on this page

Conversion-focused writers and UX specialists will notice the page design and layout first:

  • It’s segmented into easy-to-parse sections…
  • and features not one, but TWO videos showing the product in use.
  • Bullet points and illustrations abound, making the page easy to take in. No walls of text here.

Plus, the copy asks and answers questions, showing readers that Purple truly understands its target market’s problems and has an effective solution on hand.

Check, check, check.

(As for why there are potentially distracting nav menu and footer links, the jury’s out. My guess? Purple’s analytics showed that without the opportunity to explore other pages of the site, visitors bounced — so they offered ’em the ability to click around and come back to this page when ready.)

Dig a little deeper into the copy, and you’ll notice three seriously strategic ways Purple is augmenting its already savvy presentation with humor.

How humor gives Purple the edge

1. Funny and varied word choice (plus wordplay!)

Did you even KNOW there were so many words for butts in the English language? I didn’t.

In nearly every headline and sentence of body copy, Purple says “butt” in a new and different way: derriere, tail, duff, wazoo…

They also gleefully take advantage of low-hanging joke opportunities like “pain in the butt,” and give their sentences a playful cadence by using alliteration, like “precious posteriors” and “squeeze and suffocate”.

Why does this work?

Using jokes and different words to describe the same part of the anatomy keeps the reader interested, entertained, and reading further — if for no other reason to see how many unique ways you can say “butt” (19 on this page, for the record).

2. Anthropomorphization

Wow, what a long, boring word for “attributing human form or personality to”.

Purple anthropormorphizes — what else? — the reader’s butt. We see this happen right away in the hero section headline and video, where a butt is endowed with the human emotion of sadness.

It even gets its very own “Sad Butt Diary” to catalog the many injustices that plague it.

Purple's humor conversion copywriting

A bit further down, Purple suggests that our butts have been “neglected” by uncomfortable chairs (effectively anthropomorphizing those chairs in the process, too).

Why does this work?

By mentally endowing a part of our own body with its own, distinct emotions, we can more effectively empathize with that part.

Only the most mindful among us has the elastic mental perspective it takes to examine our own thoughts, feelings, and sensations from afar — but given a little mental distance from our butts, we just might start to see them more objectively.

And thinking of your butt as a separate entity also makes it easier to rationalize giving dat booty a nice present. After all, you can deal with being uncomfortable. It’s just you (and you’ve probably dealt with worse).

But when it’s your butt that’s bummed? And that butt feels like a “precious” friend whom you’ve been overlooking?

Well, you’d be a monster to ignore your friend’s complaints, wouldn’t you?

3. Strategic deployment of humor

I saved the best for last.

One of the most common questions I hear (after “Is that your natural hair color?”) is, “But where and when should I use humor in my marketing?”

My answer is the same as it is to many other copywriting questions: It depends.

It depends on your branding, your prospect’s stage of awareness of your product, your risk tolerance for pushing the humor envelope, and a whole host of other things.

BUT(T).

In general, you want to cut “cleverness” in favor of clarity. That’s a pretty hard-and-fast copywriting rule.

So it follows that you’d want to eschew humor in the parts of your marketing that are closest to the sale.

Look at where Purple is laying off the jokes and just presenting the facts, albeit in the same lively tone:

Purple's humor conversion copywriting

Why does this work?

By avoiding potentially distracting readers with humor — or accidentally over-easing readers’ anxiety, some of which is necessary to motivate a sale — Purple keeps the focus on its… bottom line.

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